The missing myrrh

Epiphany is the time and season when we seek out the Christ who asks us simply, ‘what do you want to do with your life?’

We are transferring Epiphany (6th January) to this Sunday 3rd January so that more people can benefit from the great feast of discovery. The readings for Sunday provide a comparative glance between the poetry of Isaiah’s prophecy and the reportage of the evangelist, Matthew.

One of the most profound differences of the two accounts is that Isaiah omits the gift of myrrh from the treasury of the camel train. The point here is that homage is being made to a king and the rightful gifts of a king include gold – which is of great material value – and frankincense which has much spiritual or liturgical value. Jesus, the material and spiritual king, human and divine, is the host and recipient of the pilgrims’ quest. However, in Matthew’s account, we learn that the Magi also bring the spiced-oil called myrrh. This is the ointment which is ceremoniously applied to the recently departed. This gift proves Jesus’ kingly status, the king who leads his people from death to life into a new kingdom.

Epiphany is the time and season when we seek out the Christ who asks us simply, ‘what do you want to do with your life?’  You are being called to share all the gifts of the kingdom, including the myrrh. In other words, we are called to live in the pain, injustice and hardship which is so very real and present in this world at this time. How much gold are we carrying? Do we have any room for the myrrh which is needed to give people dignity and a sign of resurrection life to come?  Experiencing the pain, hurt and hardship in others is the first step.  Jesus then says, walk on, talk with me, come and see how I will make all things new.

Matthew recorded the delivery of these gifts and, in particular, the Magi’s homage to Jesus in the form of myrrh. Here we understand the nature of their epiphany, the recognition of the King of kings. At the heart of the Christmas story is the personal act of sacrifice and love.

“Lord God, the bright splendour whom the nations seek: may we who with the wise men have been drawn by your light discern the glory of your presence in your Son, the Word made flesh, Jesus Christ our Lord.”

Post Communion prayer for Epiphany from Common Worship

We are in Tier 4 but I would like to encourage you to continue to share the life of faith with us at St Michael’s, Summertown whether physically attending public worship or through our Facebook or YouTube streaming.

Sunday services: 8am Holy Eucharist; 10am Parish Eucharist (with children’s church); 6.30pm Taizé Prayer.

Coffee after Church – if you would like to join up on Zoom with a chat with some familiar faces, please do so. Here is the invitation: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82384567362?pwd=NXF0YjFnUkk2VGZKZ09DOWNQM0REQT09
Time: Jan 3rd, 2021 at 11:30am.

No matter where you are on the journey of faith, you are always welcome at St Michael & All Angels!

Gavin

Author: Gavin Knight

The Revd Gavin Knight has been the Vicar of St Michael & All Angels, Summertown in the Oxford Diocese since September 2011. After serving his title at St Alphege, Solihull, Gavin became parish priest of St Andrew's Fulham Fields in London. He moved to Wales in 2005 becoming Chaplain to Monmouth School. He is married to Jo, a clinical psychologist, and they have three sons.